Carmel Armon, MD, MHS, FAAN, FANA

Carmel Armon, MD, is Chairman, Department of Neurology, Shamir (Assaf Harofeh) Medical Center, a teaching affiliate of Tel Aviv University School of Medicine.

Dr. Armon is a graduate of the Technion, Israel Institute of Technology, and trained in Neurology at the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. He did a fellowship in Neuroepidemiology at Mayo, and a fellowship in Clinical Neurophysiology at Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina.

Prior to accepting his present position, Dr. Armon worked at Loma Linda University School of Medicine in Loma Linda, California, and at Baystate Medical Center, Springfield, Massachusetts, a Tufts University teaching hospital.

Dr. Armon is Board Certified in Neurology in Israel and the USA, and holds several subspecialty certificates from the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology

Areas of interest and specialization

How may I help?

Memory Loss or Change in Behavior (including MCI, MBI, Alzheimer’s Disease, and other Dementias)

Many people notice as the years go by mild declines in their physical and mental abilities, including memory loss, mood changes, and rougher or less satisfying social interactions.

Stroke Diagnosis, Treatment, Prevention and Recovery

A stroke happens because of problems with the brain’s blood vessels. Sometimes an important blood vessel closes off (“ischemic stroke”), or occasionally blood may burst out of the blood vessel into the brain (“hemorrhagic stroke.”) The brain’s working is affected, either temporarily or permanently. It is important to do all we can to diagnose and prevent strokes.

ALS (Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis)

ALS is a serious disease causing progressive muscle wasting and weakness in adults, which is challenging to diagnose in its early stages. Its onset is insidious, usually in one part of the body, and it spreads from there

What do my Brain Scan findings mean?

Sometimes we are discharged from hospital, or leave a doctor’s appointment, and do not understand what happened, or how the findings on my scans relate to my symptoms and the way I feel.

Important things you should know

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

Neurology is the medical specialty that deals with the health and disease of the brain, the spinal cord, the nerves of the head and the limbs, and muscles.

Common neurological diseases are stroke, dementia (including Alzheimer’s disease), headaches, peripheral neuropathies. multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders.

Rare neurological diseases include ALS, Guillain Barre Syndrome and its chronic variant CIDP, myasthenia gravis and brain tumors.

A neurologist is specialist who deals with the health and disease of the brain, the spinal cord, the nerves of the head and the limbs, and muscles.

Neurologists diagnose and treat diseases such as stroke, dementia (including Alzheimer’s disease), headaches, peripheral neuropathies. multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, ALS (Lou Gehrig’s disease), Guillain Barre Syndrome and its chronic variant CIDP, myasthenia gravis and brain tumors.

Some neurologists choose to subspecialize in a subset of these diseases, whereas other maintain a broader range of interests.

Neurologists do not operate on the brain (that is the job of neurosurgeons). Some specialize in treating diseases of the brain blood vessels using endovascular techniques, which do not require an operation.

Dr. Armon will want to know about the reasons that brought you to the consultation, about past and active medical issues and about your medications. He will then perform a neurological exam appropriate to the reason for the consultation.

The result of the initial consultation will likely be a plan for additional tests to sort out the various possible explanations for the presenting symptoms, and for a follow-up visit to understand what the most likely explanation for the situation might be (“the diagnosis”) and to discuss its implications.

Occasionally, the diagnosis may have already been made, or may be clear at the beginning of the first visit, and it may be possible to dedicate most of the time to discussing implications.

Dr. Armon’s initial consultations extend for one hour. If additional time is needed to discuss findings and implications – an early follow-up visit can be scheduled at the end of the initial consultation. This may be conducted via video.

House calls are expensive, but one can achieve a similar effect through Teleneurology – a house call mediated by video.

Teleneurology takes place in the comfort of your own home, and saves you travel costs, travel time, and the inevitable search for convenient parking.

You can involve family members of your choice, whether with you or elsewhere, bringing them to the visit via video.

It makes sense to prepare for your Teleneurology visit, to maximize its benefit.

What clients tell about us

Patient testimonials

15 tips for a healthy brain